The Demoman Bible Part I: The Commandments & Introduction.

Welcome to what should hopefully be a recurring feature to my ever impressive blog. i52 is now over, I’m suffering from severe depression, so what better ways to ease my woes than type a shit ton of nonsense!

The effort I’m about to put in could however be completely made irrelevant again by one swift flick of Valve’s shitty balance wand!

So without further ado, let’s get started…

The Goal

My objective for this is to create a noob friendly guide to get people into the Demoman competitively. To start off with you should really already know the very basics of the demoman such as sticky jumping, left clicking, right clicking, moving forward and air pogos (Kappa). This is hopefully going to address the things that really make demoman difficult to get in to.

I’ll be looking at a variety of subject ranging from positioning, warming up, pushing, going aggressive, common mistakes, the list goes on and on, so far on that I’m genuinely concerned about what the fuck I’m getting myself into.

Naturally if you have anything else that you’d really like me to write about in relation to the Demoman do leave a comment below or get in contact with me via Steam, Twitter or my Twitch page.

The Commandments

Now, I’m tempted to do this in the whole “thou shall not be a shitty player” kinda style but after a lot of thought of how incredibly cringeworthy it would be I’ve decided against it.

1. Always have a sticky trap

This is an important one; if you’re waiting for someone to push or you’re waiting to push always have one down. This can be useful in many ways; you could get an early pick if someone tries to go aggressive, you could get a pick on the flank or you could make the medic drop someone when pushing. These will start becoming kills your team can expect to get and can gain you a further advantage on a push or save you some time trying to defend.

2. Be alert

When playing demoman you always have to be alert of what’s around you, if a scout gets close to you you are pretty much dead. You need to have the thought process of “if I get jumped or rushed by x will I be able to get out? Can I see him coming? Do I have team mates to help me?”. Having a quick glance around of your surroundings will help you make that decision.

3. Understand the maps

Map knowledge, sticky trap placements and spam arcs. Knowing the maps is a very important factor to playing demo, there are many demomen that have a favourite map, one that they put the most effort in to learning and understanding, or one that they have played the most. If you have a map that you’re 100% comfortable in you will feel more confident playing it. If there’s a map you struggle on then go through it and find out why.

4. Learn the rollouts

You don’t have to be the fastest, just fast enough that you don’t get trashed. Learning rollouts is something that I feel isn’t needed that much the higher you go, but when you are wanting to start out it’s really important, being the fastest to mid can give you a sense of dominating the other team, it will give you a massive confidence boost if you’re able to push out the opposing demoman straight away and provides a good boost for your team.

Later on though, it’s important that you have a game plan with your team when going to mid, there’s no point on being fast if you don’t know what you’re doing and if you don’t have your team mates to back you up.

5. Understand your opponents

One of the things that can be difficult when just starting out is understanding who you’re playing against and what their habits are. When you move up the divisions there are fewer teams you can play against meaning you get to understand how they play as a team and individually; where they rollout, what their habits are (going sniper, spy, holding a certain part of the point or running an engineer). This means you can be prepared for what they throw at you and counter it.

6. Be prepared

Get ready to suddenly deal with a push from any direction, if you’re holding choke but they come from a different route what are you going to do?
Much like being alert but this is more making sure you can deal with anything, always check your ammo if your running low. If a fight were to start out right now, would you have enough ammo?  Is your current position going to help you maximise your damage output? If they push from another side of the map, what will you do? Do you have a plan on what to do next?

7. Play for your team, not yourself

Don’t bait team mates, make the decision that’s right for your team, follow the calls. Never bait your team (for example, say that you’re going to block middle so then a teammate goes in first and either never actually go or half arse it., everyone is guilty of doing it at some point, but it hardly ever works.

It’s also important to make the choice that will help your team, make sure that you are following the plan as much as you can, if you don’t follow a call through, how do you know if it’s going to work or not? Try your best and if it doesn’t work you can make adjustments with your team for the next engagement. Just make sure you are really making your presence known in your team, if you’re having a bad game just do the basics of putting up traps and trying to do damage, there’s always something you can do to help.

8. Call your damage

This one is a very important thing to do as you are class that can do the most damage in the least amount of time, and this is especially important during mid fights or any non ubered engagement. If you hit a scout for 50hp on a mid fight and you have your own scout moving across the point, he will know who to target straight away. If you play demo but you don’t’ communicate then you are creating too much work for your team. There really is no exception to this, call your damage or play a class that does none.

9. Know your limits

You should always know what you can or cannot do, what your strengths and weaknesses are. Not only that but you should know what you can get away with in terms of over extending, you’ll learn this based on their positioning, where they are falling back from, the map and who’s alive on both teams. Personally I know if I’m going to achieve something when I jump in as soon as I do it. Unfortunately for me most of the time I achieved fuck all, so I stopped doing it.

10. Watch your demos

This one I can’t stress enough. I know from personal experience that it does work, I’d have a massive issue with over extending and generally being out of position. The issue is that if you get caught out you kinda have to brush it off as you need to focus on the game, whereas when you review the demo afterwards, you have more time to acknowledge your costly mistake. On top of this being able to review a STV demo is a lot more helpful as you can clearly see what’s going on with your teammates as well, you can check your position in relation to theirs and see what you could do to help them. It’s also very good for looking at any failed pushes/aggression as you can get an overhead view and see what caused you a problem.


 

Closing thoughts

Now that shit is all out of the way, I’ll be focusing more on the breakdown of some of the points above and others not listed, I’m hoping to maybe do one of these a week, my original plan was to do at least two a week however I have recently come in the possession of something distracting.

This fucker right here is incredibly time consuming.

This fucker right here is incredibly time consuming.

I’ll try my best to get these done in a timely matter.

 

Peace out brah.

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Leave a comment

3 Comments

  1. Bren

     /  September 5, 2014

    Nice pussy

    Reply
  2. TF2 Bots are Better than me.

     /  September 12, 2014

    This seriously has to be one of the best guides that exist.
    Its so fucking awesome that it makes me want to switch mains LOL.(*currently a Medic main*)

    Moar please.And don’t hold back on the f*cks,it helps get important points across for others.

    Reply
  3. Excellent guide!

    Reply

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